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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the european politicians and believing in the euro project, are you? >> well, i was. breaking up, wouldn't be here -- >> you're going to tell me that you're convicted on the aussie/dollar. >> no, i'm not convicted. i'm admitting that i've been wrong. we think aussie is terribly overvalued and that's the problem, frankly. >> good to have you on. plenty more to come from you. the ecb is going to keep its interest rates at a record low today. that's what we expect, anyway. the markets will be listening to the delivery tone of mario draghi's delivery. silvia wadhwa is back at her delivery post. 2013 [ speaking foreign language ]. >> everything is going to stay the same. the ecb hasn't got anything to do right now. they've pretty much said everything on track, probably the best, cheapest intervention they had so far was the program. every month announced again. we stand ready to act, but so far they haven't had to do anything because nobody has asked for an omt program yet. but the market believes that the ecb is there as the backstop. so far, that was very successful. in terms of anything el
/dollar, 11.6236. euro/dollar, 1.3166. kind of where we were yesterday. asian markets in china and japan will be catching up on news on the u.s. fiscal cliff deal. we'll get december sales figures from japan's retailing. the owner of stores are set to release its q1 earnings today. samsung electronics is expected to post its q4 earnings guidance. that's all on the agenda in asia. but what investors are to do with what we've got so far this year? joining us now, nicholas. these are the classic risk off day yesterday. how do you categorize it and what it means for -- >> well, i mean, obviously, you know, i think it's important to be clear that this was a rally not based -- based not on what the deal did, but what the deal undid. clearly, the good news is that the u.s. americansfully avoided an even bigger fiscal issue. but, you know, i think clearly it shows how low we've actually sunk in the realm of investors expectations when the markets are actually rallying on essentially muddling through. and this is a well trodden path. it's a fairly familiar tale. and we've obviously seen it in the
. euro/dollar, we've traded between 1.30, 1.50, 1.32 the last couple of weeks. that's where we stand in europe. we have the latest out of asia. >>> thank you. a mixed day of trade finish asian borses. the nikkei snapped a two-day losing streak ending .7% higher. talk as the boj set to ease its monetary policy this month by boosting its asset purchase program. after a brief pause yesterday the yen weakened against the u.s. dollar again today fueling automakers and other exporter stocks. >>> elsewhere, the shanghai finished flat as investors remained cautious ahead of trade and cip data due out. reports that more property curves will be made itted to tame rising housing prices. agricultural stocks surged on expectations that beijing's urban growth plan will support food production. in hong kong, the hang seng rebounded half a percent from the lowest level in the week. mainly banks gained momentum after ubs upgraded icbc. concerns over q4 earnings sent the kospi lower by .3%. the fifth straight day of losses for south korean shares. i.t. stocks and development ralliers pushed higher .4%
this morning been up to 89.35. euro/yen higher, stipulating around the 118 mark, as well. euro/dollar had big moves yesterday, posting with the spanish auction mr. draghi and the ecb coming out saying it was unanimous about no interest rate cuts whereas in the previous month there had been some discussion about that. euro/dollar, 11.3260. let's bring you up to speed with the asian trading session today as they wrap up the week. li sixuan joins us for the first time today. >> thanks, ross. japan was a clear outperformer after shinzo abe unveiled his massive stimulus plan. and the nikkei gained 1.4% today. just to put it into context, this index is up for the ninth straight week, its longest winning streak since late 1988. shares of stocks surged to nearly 5% after the operator of clothing chain unicore raised its full year guidance. but hotter than expected cpi data from china put new pressure on the shanghai deposit. there will be more curbs to taint housing prices. meanwhile, weakness in china's blue chips dropped the hang seng lower. but hsbc did lend some support after the bank said yester
higher on the bund yields. sannish yields back over the 5% mark. on the currency markets, euro/dollar is at 1.3361. dollar/yen pulling away from its nine-month highs at 88.70th at the moment, as well. that's where we stand in europe. sixuan has more for us from singapore in the asian session. >> sure. thank you, ross. asian markets were a bit of a mixed bag. the shanghai composite gained .6% after yesterday's 3% job. since then, numbers were boosted by china's top security official who said beijing could lift the quota for investors to invest in the mainland markets by as much as nine times. environmental stocks surged. aerospace stock took off on an upbeat industry outlook. the hang seng finished marginally in the red. oil majors and telcos were the market laggers. persisting weakness in the yen boosted exporters. meanwhile, in technology shares wait on south korea kospi ending lower with 1.2%. in australia, the asx 200 ended just a touch below the line. miners were weaker. more on that from our guest later in the show. back to you, ross. >> thanks for that, swish won. catch y
. >> japan is facing a $255 million euro loss for philips. >>> cutting a key interest rate by 25 basis point is the bank of india. >>> and the boj is keeping tune rate until there's a significant drop in unloimt. >>> and ahead of today's parliamentary hearing, italy's economic mip sister takes grilli takes center stage. >>> all right. reunited. back together. >> so nice. >> you know that song? >> i sang that to you the last time. we've had a couple of reunions and a series of time spent apart. >> how are things sthp. >> they are great here. how was davos? >> so far, gone, in the distant memory. don't worry about it for another year. plenty to worry about today, though. >> korea. >> on today's show, plenty of good stuff coming up. we're going to be in madrid as the prime minister is reportedly releasing a plan to relief some of the pain of austerity. >> then it's south korean steel giant posco reporting quarterly earnings today. we'll have the latest live from seoul at 10:15. and it's day one of the fomc meeting. economists are awaiting more clues from the stimulus program. we'll be live in n
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
to the opening bell. we're watching also outside of equities a big move in the euro u.s. dollar up 1%, which is a huge move for the currency markets. we're also watching oil. oil also up by about a percent or so on the back of the very good china export data that came in overnight. >> nigerian barges out there with huge cargos as i'm trying to rationalize how is it that o oil -- we're paying so much for gasoline. >> mineral exploration company based in vancouver. owner and operator of fitness clubs in the northeast. up pretty much across the board. just jumping out at me, intel, hewlett-packard and dell still stringing together pretty nice gains. hugh let hewlett-packard up. very fascinating report out yesterday, we had tony on last night on fast talking about the sum of the parts analysis. if hp breaks up or just realized to its full potential under meg whitman, $29 a share is what he's pegging some of the parts analysis at. >> when you pronounce something dead, whether sprint versus verizon and at&t versus clearwire, what we discover is there's a resilience even to companies that we basica
auction where in their first big debt aukz of the year, they're 5.8 billion euros above their 5 billion target. here is what's happening across the curve in bond markets in europe. the spanish ten-year, 4.99%. in italy, 4.17%. the bund, meanwhile, about 1.5%. gilt just over 2%. the interesting point here, guys, is that part of the reason why this is we're waiting on the ecb's latest decision. they're not going to need to do much more if current market conditions prevail. this is a pretty good way for them to start. so that auction going well, spanish yields coming into euro. if i can give you a sense of what's happening in other markets, the euro is higher. european equities for the most part as you're looking there are mixed to flat. but here is a look at what's been grabbing our attention. up .3% to 1.31. that i just want to bring your attention to. the all of points down there, you're looking at the dollar/yen. that's the other major story that we continue to follow. 88 was the level breached in trade today as the yen continues to weaken by the dollar by .is 3%. we'll wait to see if
in syria, another year of the war in gaza, the euro crisis, penn state, trayvon martin, petraeus, 2012 is a year in many ways, forget the phrase, sucked, which is why it's been worth it as ever to con come the things that did not suck. that did not suck about this year. legitimately without irony or only with a trace amount. behold a clear year that sucked much less than you remember it sucking. everybody on this show is a 13-year-old boy. they were all giggling over this. apparently someone drawing a circle around the florida panhandle is hilarious. whether it is chuck todd or this from cnn because he's putting his hands on it. members of my staff swear putting shapes on the state of florida is all problematic. yes, i get it. i get it less than most people. i do see something in the associated press map. mitt romney won the counties in orange, newt gingrich won the ones in red. do you see that? look closer. they totally saw it. it's a giraffe! best new thing in the world today. you are grounded, staffers. this photo of mitt romney in iowa in october 2007 is the greatest campaign trail
, mr. speaker. like the prime minister, i want to see a fresh a settlement for euro. german beer drinkers made 13 times more duty than british drinkers. and spanish drinkers -- british drinkers paid 9.2% in spanish tankers and 10,000 more duty than spanish drinkers. will he take the chancellor for a pint? and do something for british pubs and british republicans speak with my honorable friend quite rightly speaks up for -- i remember visiting the great bravery with him during the last election. i'm sure the chancellor would have listened very carefully to what he said but i think it's very important that we action also tried to support the pub trade in the country and the government has planned for that as well. >> mr. speaker, thousands of my constituents in insulated homes fear high sky whether built. they are 7% interest charges with only five households signed up for it. how has the prime minister achieved this fiasco? >> i would say to the honorable gentleman i hope you'll welcome the green deal because it gives households the opportunity to cut their bills and to cut their
barely 1%. and with an advanced economies, the euro zone, mostly in recession, uk is borderline recession, and even the united states, compared to other advanced economies growing in my rue is going to grow another year, a trend of 1.6%, 1.7%. keeps unemployment rate very high. >> reporter: and that's important. rate of growth, keeps unemployment very high in this country. key to all of that is some sort of grand bargain, grand deal in washington. not expecting that any time soon. outlook for housing improvement. but not as much as i think all of us would like to see. soledad. >> great, poppy. thanks for that. >>> ahead on "starting point." vice president biden begins his next four years, he reflects on his past term and his a-ha moment and why he decided to take on the nra. >>> she dated lance armstrong for years. sheryl crow is talking about armstrong's confession that, in fact, he did dope. and new pictures of an aftermath of a major fire in chicago. look at that building encased in ice. back in a moment. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obliga
. as teens, you know, we're so used to that, that euroing i dok it's at all strange. >> this doesn't shock you that this guy thought he had a girlfriend and never met her. >> unfortunately, no. >> sam. >> what's different about our generation we don't group online relationships and interpersonal relationships differently and think they're the same thing. we talk to someone online, text th them, e -mail them. >> talking about a girlfriend. would either of you label someone online a girlfriend or boyfriend you never met in person? >> absolutely not. >> one thing i say with manti te'o one thing he differe differentiated. he forget the personal part. >> we wouldn't do that. >> the dismiss that. >> i will bring you in, in a second, doctor. we asked our viewer, more than 25,000 responded. are you surprised someone can develop an emotional relationship with someone online, 76% said now and 24% said yes. >> their generation doesn't know life without the internet, texting, facebooking, this is how friendships and relations p relationshirelationshi relationships develop, you and i know getting on t
.s. dollar. but you can see right now, the dollar is down against the euro, which is back up at 1.3361. the dollar is up against the yen, 89.31. and gold prices this morning have gained a little bit of ground. up $7.70 to $1,668730. right now it's time for the global markets report. let's get over to kelly evans would is standing by in london. >> kelly, good morning. becky, good morning. i heard joe's comment about my hair. i will get back to that later, but i will say it was snowing earlier. it's beautiful. but that's not responsible for any notable change in look. just take a quick look at what's been happening wind me in europe. we're in the green for the most part behind bigger than expected industrial production. i wanted to show smu stocks because it's merger news monday. you guys have briefly mentioned a couple of these. down there, you can see swatch is up 3.8% after saying it's going to buy the julie business harry winston. we saw harry winston at the golden globes last night or at least you guys did. i certainly wasn't up. generali,'s new ceo looking to shed capital shar
of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home. it's john major all over again. >> ed miliband and david cameron. and a few hours later the commons debate on the e.u. budget began in earnest. >> now, let me take this multiannual framework -- or e.u. budget, to use a simple word -- to ask for the european union to ask for a 10% real increase above inflation is insulting to our constituents, it's ensubtling, it is insulting to the people of spain and italy ask and portugal and ireland who are being told to pull in tear belts. -- in their belts. >> isn't the trut
chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a out of world right now. i'm not sure that it's going to be less -- it is a very chaotic world right now. i'm not sure that it's going to be less chaotic if we pull back, because bad actors will fill that power vacuum. host: james kitfield of the "national journal." caller: google james morris, r ussia today, you will see that it is a spinoff --sia russia today, you will see that it is as enough -- a spinoff. guest: they kind of backed the idea that assad just stay in power. israel likes the status quo. the arab spring totally reshuffles the strategic calculus for israel, especially with the peace treaty. the israelis are very nervous about a lot of the repercussions from the arab spring. are they pushing for this rebellion that gets rid of assad? not to my knowledge. it has been really focused on the shiite gulf countries like saudi arabia -- sunnis in the saudi arabia. saudi arabia, qatar, and others have been very wo
by employers were looking for those euros. the crowd funding legislation which will help young entrepreneurs get access to net capital and create jobs something i hope the sec will immediately come up with a rule so these people can start creating jobs and raising money. legislation to reform wall street. when i was the deciding vote to strengthen our country's financial system legislation to eliminate and owners 3% withholding tax, a tax that would affect government contractors. legislation to ensure that our fallen heroes received the dignity and respect they raised deserve at the arlington national cemetery and that is something now that is also fixed and many many other congressional actions that have made a difference not only in massachusetts but in this great country. these were all shared successes but i was proud to be part of each and every one of them. i have always said that in order to do our business as our country's leaders, we must do our work in a bipartisan bicameral manner to ensure that the actions taken by the congress benefit all americans, not just those of one politic
a good rekonkry. >> we're in a better place than the rest of the world. the euro crisis is not over although it seemed to have been abated. that's going to keep happening. the chinese economy is in bigger trouble than it's been in a long time. so that's worrisome. and so in the u.s. the real problem ultimately is a political problem because our economy is slowly recovering. things are starting to turn around and what could spiral us backward really is if one of these upcoming fights on sequestration or the next debt celling, ceiling, you know, finally causes it to -- >> that is sort of baked in the cake. everybody expects they're going keep kicking it down the road. why, then, do we have a surge in stock market? >> one is that corporate profits are very good. but don't forget corporate companies are holding that money aside. they don't want to reinvest. they're worried about the economy and it's not that helpful. the season reason is because the federal reserve has kept interest rates so so low that there's almost no other place for people to put their money. so
of folks that over the last couple of years said the euro zone wasn't going to make us, europe wouldn't be with us anymore, that clearly was overstated. it never was going todom pass. the united states had all sorts of issues in its own government. you didn't see double-dip recession in the u.s. think about before the u.s. election how many people said these companies are keeping trillions of dollars on the sidelines because they're worried about the u.s. how many people are keeping trillions of dollars on the sidelines because they're worried about uncertainty in china? china is more uncertain. two thirds of the world's growth comes from emerging markets. these are countries much more volatile. now the financial crisis finally in our rear-view mirror, we'll spend more time in there. >>eric: what the arab summer? arab spring, arab summer? >> we have a boom going on, offshore gas brazil and mexico. as a consequence, the down side in the middle east which is exploding, that will have less impact on the u.s. ironically the fact that it has less impact on the u.s. means the likelihood tha
thing i'm not really afraid of us in this world are the rating agencies. >> only because the euro is so weak, the chinese are where they are. we can't depend on the rest of the world being feckless forever. >> people like me have been saying for five years, don't worry about these deficit things for the time being. they're not an issue. other people have saying imminent crisis, imminent crisis. how many times do they have to be wrong and do people like me have to be right before people start to believe in us? >> you're right until the day you're wrong, and that's a bad day. >> and he's on the sides of buses in spain. there we go. >> he's huge! >> paul krugman. >> thank you so much. >> this is fascinating. you've got to come back. it's great to have such diversity of thoughts. i'm serious. >> come back. >> spirited. >> the book is "end this depression now!" out in paperback. read it. we'll talk about it more. >> you're too early in the morning. >> you think so? >> yeah. >> why? >> the viewers may like it, but i don't. >> class doesn't start this early. >> oh, my goodness. >> we'll have y
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)